No comments yet
Tools and Services for the Imagination

Heat wave tips from the New York Times 

Stay hydrated.
Drink two to four glasses of water every hour. Do not wait until you are thirsty to hydrate your body.Pay attention to what you eat and drink.
Eat less salty food and protein, which produce metabolic heat that causes water loss. Eat more fruits and vegetables and smaller, frequent meals. Alcohol consumption can increase the effect of heat.Seek out indoor activities.
The sun’s peak hours are generally 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Avoid as much direct sunlight as possible.Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing. Take cool showers or baths.
If you can pour water on exposed skin. Applying cold, wet towels on the neck, wrist, groin and armpit areas can help bring down the core body temperature. Wearing a hat protects you from direct sun; sunburns affect your body’s ability to cool down and can make you dehydrated. Air conditioners are better than electric fans for keeping your body cool.

Don’t leave children or pets in a car.
The sun’s radiation heats objects that it strikes, such as a dark dashboard or seat, warming the air trapped inside a vehicle. It takes about two minutes for a car to go from a safe temperature to an unsafe 94.3 degrees.

Learn the signs of heat stroke and heat exhaustion.
The C.D.C. lists some of the signs as dizziness, a rapid pulse, nausea, headache and fainting. But symptoms can vary. Those having heat stroke, which is potentially fatal, might have a rapid but strong pulse, while those with heat exhaustion might have a rapid but weak one.

For your pets, take these simple precautions provided by ASPCA experts:

  • Pets can get dehydrated quickly, so give them plenty of fresh, clean water when it’s hot or humid outdoors. Make sure your pets have a shady place to get out of the sun, be careful not to over-exercise them, and keep them indoors when it’s extremely hot.
  • Know the symptoms of overheating in pets, which include excessive panting or difficulty breathing, increased heart and respiratory rate, drooling, mild weakness, stupor or even collapse. Symptoms can also include seizures, bloody diarrhea and vomit along with an elevated body temperature of over 104 degrees.
  • Animals with flat faces, like Pugs and Persian cats, are more susceptible to heat stroke since they cannot pant as effectively. These pets, along with the elderly, the overweight, and those with heart or lung diseases, should be kept cool in air-conditioned rooms as much as possible.
  • Never leave your animals alone in a parked vehicle. Not only can it lead to fatal heat stroke, it is illegal in several states!
  • Do not leave pets unsupervised around a pool—not all dogs are good swimmers. Introduce your pets to water gradually and make sure they wear flotation devices when on boats. Rinse your dog off after swimming to remove chlorine or salt from his fur, and try to keep your dog from drinking pool water, which contains chlorine and other chemicals.
  • Feel free to trim longer hair on your dog, but never shave your dog: The layers of dogs’ coats protect them from overheating and sunburn. Brushing cats more often than usual can prevent problems caused by excessive heat. And be sure that any sunscreen or insect repellent product you use on your pets is labeled specifically for use on animals.
  • When the temperature is very high, don’t let your dog linger on hot asphalt. Being so close to the ground, your pooch’s body can heat up quickly, and sensitive paw pads can burn.
  • Remember that food and drink commonly found at barbeques can be poisonous to pets. Keep alcoholic beverages away from pets, as they can cause intoxication, depression and comas. Similarly, remember that your snacks should not be a treat for your pet; any change of diet, even for one meal, may give your dog or cat severe digestive ailments. Avoid raisins, grapes, onions, chocolate and products with the sweetener xylitol.

Please stay COOL! We look forward to helping you!

Facebook
Website
118 West 22nd Street NYC 10011
212 243-8800        www.hwc.tv

Comments are closed.